Health

Why we should breathe properly for a healthy back plus details of next year’s Exel Nordic walking poles

A couple of articles have caught my eye this week – the value of the basic press-up and a possible answer for our £1 billion back problem.  Press-ups it seems are back in fashion following the publication of a recent scientific study revealing them as the best exercise you can do for your health (they clearly haven’t heard of Nordic walking…). 

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The miracle cure

The Guardian devoted three pages this week to what it deemed ‘the miracle cure’ - exercise.  Depression, heart disease, stroke, cancer, diabetes, blood pressure, sleep - all, it said, are positively impacted by exercise.  Not to mention weight loss (when combined with healthy eating), stronger bones, fewer falls in the elderly... and the list went on. 

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Stroke prevention, healthy bones and exercise

Research published last week shed further light on the benefits of taking up exercise at any stage in your life. According to the study by Erik Prestgaard of the University of Oslo, getting fit in your 40s and 50s could halve your long term risk of a stroke. 

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Tick alert, our new mindful Nordic walking course plus our nations slide toward inactivity

Mind full or mindful?  A neat play on words.  I don’t know about you but my mind is often full!  According to the Neuroscientist Amishi Jha, in neurological terms it’s all about where your attention is (mine flits all over the place).  Her TEDx talk (Taming Your Wandering Mind) is fascinating and worth a watch.

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Plantar Fasciitis explained plus why you need to be especially watchful of the cows at this time of year

If you’ve ever had a pain in your heel or underneath your foot, chances are it’s plantar fasciitis.  Statistically about one in ten of us are likely to get it and we are most at risk during middle–age.  I’ve had conversations with a number of you recently about this most frustrating of conditions so I asked Susie Burness of Bristol Physio if she could explain what it is, how it comes about, and what treatments are available.  Here’s what she said:

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The less tangible benefits of Nordic walking

From politics to food choices to sport there is one common thread: not everyone likes the same thing.  So whilst I love Nordic walking and can see its many benefits, it is not everyone’s cup of tea.  On paper, Nordic walking looks impressive: engaging 90% of our muscles; burning up to 46% more calories than ordinary walking; challenging both the upper and lower body to give a total body workout; strengthening your postural muscles and firming your core.  But when I’m asked what Nordic walking’s key benefits are I increasingly turn to its less tangible qualities:

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Hot weather walking advice and something for everyone with our June walks

We have our final flurry of long walks coming up before the summer lull.  Two local and two further afield.  All are excellent.  Have a read and see if you fancy any of the following – we’d love you to join us:

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The head case – physical activity and mental wellbeing

Last week was mental health awareness week.  We all have mental health.  It is the umbrella term covering our emotional, psychological, and social wellbeing and affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others and make choices.  Good mental health is an asset that helps us to thrive. Increasingly we mistakenly assume that ongoing stress is the price we have to pay to keep our lives on track.

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Geof's asthma story and a few facts about red deer

 “I’m leaving asthma behind me thanks to Nordic walking” says Geof Newman, one of our Oldbury Court Nordic walkers in an article published by Asthma UK.  Geof started walking with us in May 2016 and the impact it has had on his asthma has been profound.  I know that this is the case for several of you (I will shortly be printing Heather’s story) and here’s some of the reasons why:

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The back care blog - latest research and technique tips

I was fascinated by research published by the George Institute Sydney last week which concluded that taking drugs for back pain is largely pointless.  A bold statement, I thought, given that back pain is most commonly managed by prescribing medicines such as anti-inflamatories. 

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